Seeing Sounds:
A Chromesthesia Concert

       

“Seeing Sounds: A Chromesthesia Concert”, was developed as part of
Manchester Science Festival.

You can hear the audio from that performance of the show here:



WHAT’S THIS THEN?


 “Seeing Sounds: A Chromesthesia Concert” is part string quartet concert, part science communication.
The string quartet are hooked up to lights that directly visualise the sounds they make. Here’s me demonstrating on viola:


In between performances, I tell the audience about all the latest cutting-edge research into chromesthesia, tell some stories about people with the condition, and explain a bit about how it works in the brain.

 WHAT’S CHROMESTHESIA?

Chromesthesia is a neurological condition which results in people seeing colours whenever they hear sounds. It’s a kind of synaesthesia, which is a more general term for people’s senses getting crossed over. 

BLIMEY

I know!

HOW DID YOU GET THAT IDEA THEN?

Lots of composers and musicians have had synaesthesia of some kind, and I think it’d be interesting to try to see what they see!

CAN I SEE IT?

Yes! The whole thing was recorded, and there’ll be a documentary about the show, and Synaesthesia, released online in the new year. 

In the meantime here are some short clips. Unfortunately these don’t quite get across the full effect - we were troubleshooting some issues with the lights for Violin 1 at the time, so the lights are a bit flickery and unresponsive. The real thing looks a bit more like the solo video above. But you’ll get the gist and there’s some beautiful playing from Echo Chamber.







 

 If you’re interested or want to know more, I’d love to hear from you - get in touch: